Santa Monica Spanish Gut Remodel

Santa Monica Spanish Gut Remodel - Front view

Front door after re build

Demolition of the old

 

 

Rebuilt new entry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Out with the old

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - framing

A “Gut” remodel/restoration of a turn of the Century Spanish revival home located in Santa Monica.
The house was completely stripped to the “good” studs and rebuilt from the inside out.  As is the case in Los Angeles,
rebuilding a home and bringing it up to current building code standard, requires building from the inside out.  New foundations,
framing and mechanical systems create a new home.

  • Remodel/restoration of Spanish revival home

  • New pool house and custom pool with fountain

  • Complete “Chef’s style” kitchen

  • Unique open beamed ceiling

  • Moroccan tile

  • Plaster ceiling molding

 

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - pool house and pool

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - living room

Kitchen cabinets - rough install

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - happy tradespeople !

 

Testing paint colors

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - finish kitchenSanta Monica Gut Remodel - Moroccan tile and plaster ceiling in the hallwaySanta Monica Gut Remodel - tile risers on stairs

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - Pool houseSanta Monica Gut Remodel - steel column frame for pool house

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - exterior painting

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - gargage for living

 

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - custom driveway gate

Parts and pieces – the front gate and custom wrought iron.

Santa Monica Gut Remodel - craning in trees

Landscaping with large specimen trees being craned onto the site.

FramingSanta Monica Gut Remodel - outdoor fireplace

 

 

 

Building a New House in Ojai and Ventura County

Building in the City of Ojai is a fairly straightforward process.  The town itself is quite small, only 4.4 miles, beyond those boundaries you are in the unincorporated area of  Ventura County – a bit more challenging building process.  Call us to help you navigate the building process.

Geography

Ojai is located at 34°26′57″N 119°14′48″W

The city is generally at 745 feet (227 m) above sea level.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.4 square miles (11 km2), of which only 0.35% is water, and the rest is land.

Ojai is situated in a small east-west valley, north of Ventura and east of Santa Barbara. It is approximately 15 miles (24 km) inland from the Pacific Ocean coast.

Since Ojai is lined up with an east-west mountain range, it is one of few towns in the world to have a “Pink Moment” occur as the sun is setting. The fading sunlight creates a brilliant shade of pink for several minutes on the Topatopa Bluffs, over 6,000 feet (1,800 m) above sea level at the east end of the Ojai Valley. Nordhoff Ridge, the western extension of the Topatopa Mountains, towers over the north side of the town and valley at more than 5,000 feet (1,500 m). Sulphur Mountain creates the southern ranges bounding the Ojai Valley, a little under 3,000 feet (910 m) in elevation. The Sulphur and Topatopa Mountains are part of the Transverse Ranges system.

The Ventura River flows through the Ventura River Valley, draining the mountains surrounding Ojai to the north and east and emptying into the Pacific Ocean at the city of Ventura. The Ventura River was once known for its steelhead fishing before Matilija Dam and Lake Casitas were constructed, eliminating habitat for this trout species.

The climate of Ojai is Mediterranean, characterized by hot, dry summers, sometimes exceeding 100 °F (38 °C), and mild winters, with lows at night sometimes below freezing. As is typical for much of coastal southern California, most precipitation falls in the form of rain between the months of October and April, with intervening dry summers.

Pasadena Historic Preservation

From the Pasadena Heritage News – an interesting article on how Pasadena, a city that takes preservation seriously, handles illegal construction. Note the penalty – 4 years no construction allowed !

PRESERVATION UPDATES

Pasadena_demolition

City Levies Penalty for Illegal Demolition

The City of Pasadena recently issued a ruling against the owners of a project on Prescott Street where an eligible historic home was virtually demolished against city code and without proper permits. Neighbors alerted the city when they believed work on the property was going far beyond the permitted plans. After calls to our office by the neighbors months ago, Pasadena Heritage offered free architectural consultation to the owners. That offer was rejected.

On November 18th, the Historic Preservation Commission voted unanimously to support city staff’s determination that this was an illegal demolition of an historic resource. Pasadena Heritage attended the Commission meeting to speak in support of the staff’s action and joined Craftsman Heights’ residents in expressing sadness and frustration at the loss of this architecturally significant home. The penalty is that no construction can take place on the site for four years, however, there are other remedies the owners can pursue that could allow an acceptable project to move forward.

Photo credit: City of Pasadena

New Construction in Southern California – Weather and Project Management

By: Otis Bradley

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Sunny California is usually such an easy place to build – weather wise – we take it for granted.

I heard a story (not my job) of a guy doing a roof tear off in July in a little town in Southern California. Not thinking twice about rain, he removed the entire roof without providing any protection. Guess what? A freak summer storm rolled in and drenched the building and all of the stores that were doing business below. Can you spell L A W S U I T ?

The year this project occurred was during the El Niño storm season. From all of the water entering the home, clay muck sticks to your shoes 4″ thick! Because this happened the builder now had to deal with the following Hazards:

  • slippery
  • dangerous
  • the job site port a potty was the job site…
  • mold
  • guys don’t show up
  • mud

digger_stuck_in_mud

Although, building in Southern California seems like the perfect place to be, things can still happen and sometimes lead to disasters at your job site.

 

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Feel Free to copy, share, or re post this article. Kindly make sure to include this information: Written by Otis Bradley, a Custom Home Builder, in Southern California. Please see OtisBradley.com for more information on Custom Home Building!